Radical Feminism and Catholicism

Radical Feminism and Catholicism

 

Hey guys! I came across this article, what are your views on feminism which is radical, and how Catholicism can affect women?

 

Laura Goode investigates her Catholic identity—the radical, feminist, social-justice-oriented version she discovered upon encountering the mysteries of marriage and motherhood—years after her departure from the guilt-stricken, conservative Catholicism of her upbringing.

via Against Confession: On Intersectional Feminism, Radical Catholicism, and Redefining Remorse — Longreads

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‘I want to live, not exist’

‘I want to live, not exist’

Death is an uncomfortable subject for most. It’s one of those “unknowns” which we just cannot deal with. So we turn towards faith to tell us that there is an afterlife, or that we’ll be reborn. Or we can turn to science which tells us that we’ll just be part of that circle of life, becoming food for insects and fertilizer for plants. Cool.

 

But since it’s an uncomfortable topic it stops us from discussing things we REALLY should be talking about. Like suicide. And euthanasia.

 

In simple terms, euthanasia is also known as ‘mercy killing’. It’s when someone decides to end to their own life due to a debilitating disease or chronic condition, causing the person to want to die, with the help of medical professionals, instead of living like that for the rest of their (however long) life.

 

Malta is finally being forced to discuss this topic, thanks to an ALS sufferer who wants to have the option of euthanasia when he becomes completely dependent and paralysed due to his condition.

 

Recently I was having a discussion with someone, which made me realise that I’m still stuck on this topic. While I’m a firm believer in choices, euthanasia is effectively assisted suicide, so if I’m in favour of assisted suicide, then aren’t I saying that I wouldn’t do my utmost to help a patient or a client who comes to me with problems ? Would I just help them get the paperwork signed for assisted suicide the second they mention it? And with that reasoning, would I do my utmost to stop someone from committing suicide?

 

I mean the reasons for assisted suicide and suicide are effectively the same – one sees a terrible future/present with no way out of it. In the case of euthanasia the reason is medical – ex. parkinsons, ALS, terminal cancer. In suicide’s case the reason is usually social or psychological – falling into debt, the end of a relationship, mental illness.

 

So why is it ok for someone to end their life for a medical reason, which is usually visible, but if it’s a psychosocial reason then that’s wrong? It’s like saying that being depressed isn’t a real thing because you can just smile it away, but breaking a leg is a real problem.

 

It’s like saying that people with terminal or chronic illness feel more pain and suffering than people with severe depression, or someone who has lost their job and have no idea how they’re going to support their family.

 

I guess my generic opinion is this: I would do everything I can to help that person have a better life, to help them see that they have a future. But at the end of the day the choice is theirs. So no, I won’t help them get the paperwork signed the second they mention the words “assisted suicide”, I would help them process this decision, give them the counselling they need. And then, if they want to go through with it, then I’ll be there, holding their hand.

 

And while I can’t hold the hand of someone who is committing suicide, I would wish I had. Because I would have done my best to help them have a reason to live, but if that fails, at least they wouldn’t be alone in their final moments.

 

To Convert or Not To Convert

To Convert or Not To Convert

Conversion therapy is an act of attempting to change something about someone – generally through aversion therapy. So think electroshock therapy and fear. The general consensus amongst mental health professionals is that conversion therapy, particularly gay conversion therapy is inhumane and does not work.

Unfortunately, things take a while to reach this island. And even though our mental health professionals and associations have explicitly stated that they are against gay conversion therapy – our dear religious institution (ie. Church of Malta/Curia) has stated that it is in FAVOUR of gay conversion therapy, and that the proposed bill which would make it illegal has “serious ethical and legal issues”.

I have many issues with the Church’s position paper, but I’ll stick to my main ones.

1. The Church submitting a policy paper on an issue which is not religious is frankly ridiculous.

2. Comparing paedophiles with homosexuals is ignorant at best. Paedophiles have been found to be interested in children, regardless of their gender. So no, they’re not homosexuals, or heterosexuals for that matter. They are attracted to children for the sake of them being children.

3. The idea that homosexuals are superior to heterosexuals is completely flawed. There are laws stating that you cannot fire someone from their employment because they’re gay for the simple reason that no one in history has ever been fired for being straight. That shows that gay people are not superior to straight people – quite the opposite in fact.

4. The Church states that the law discriminates against straight people because it does not protect them from being pushed into conversion therapy to make them gay. Here I ask ANYONE who was pressured or forced to be gay to please message me with your story. Frankly, at least to my knowledge, no one has ever been kicked out of their home for being straight, or ostracised, or forced into conversion therapy.

This position paper shows the sheer homophobia still present within Malta’s religious institution, where they cannot even be in favour of a bill which would protect innocent people from therapies designed at making them hate themselves.

A Tale of Two Religions

A Tale of Two Religions

The Maltese pride themselves on being Christian Catholics, and at the same time, very nice and welcoming people. It’s almost as though we have a booklet entitled ‘Being Maltese’ with all the cultural laws we need to follow on a day-by-day basis. Unfortunately, it also seems as though the fine print in this booklet says “except with Muslims”.

Every time people of the Islamic faith group up and pray somewhere in public, it will surely end up on the media – followed by comments of “I’m not racist but…” where the person would then list all the non-sensical reasons why Muslims shouldn’t be allowed to pray in public. Recently, the Muslim community has been praying in front of the church in Imsida. And instead of being glad that at least some prayer is going on there, people started complaining that it was disrespectful. Because a Muslim praying anywhere but in a Mosque is blasphemous to the all-mighty, true, Christian god. But you know – at least from this uprising the Muslim community may finally get a place it can pray in that can withstand the growing needs of that community.

 

 

musulmani

Look at how threatening they are! Image courtesy of tvm.com.mt

 

But to make things worse, the self-named Maltese Patriots (Ghaqda Patrijotti Maltin), started handing out ham sandwiches during a protest they held at the very site which was being used by Muslims to pray (pictured above). According to one member of the group, some Muslim parents were complaining in a particular school about Christian children being given ham sandwiches for lunch. This turned out to be a complete lie, with the Principle of that school and various Muslim parents setting the record straight.

So not only did the group lie about an entire community, as a why of riling up the Maltese (because let’s face it, the only way to really wake up this nation is to somehow awaken their “but not my children” side), but they also completely disrespected the beliefs held by this community. It’s like it’s Ash Wednesday or Good Friday and someone is throwing meat and chocolate in your face.

Though, most of the time, that wouldn’t affect you. But it would affect someone who actually takes their religion seriously.